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GLMark2 Scores
#1
Since I've been doing a few recently, lets put up some scores and update as I go along/do updates

format is 
name  Offscreen/Onscreen (locked means locked to screen)
* = emulated, so not a true judgment of GPU

Nvida Jetson        396/1995 (yup it really reports slower off screen...odd, guess it reports its status flag inverted)
UP^2                  1593/657 (jellyfish corrupts)
Up Core  GLES     1291/514 (jellyfish corrupts)
Up Core  GL3       1259/495 (jellyfish still corrupts)(just to compare gl and gles, no real advantage apart from easier coding

Odroid XU4          743/410 (yup we've had this level of power for years)
Pine RockPro64    714/locked
Tinkerboard         470/locked ( recent updates have seen this drop to around 390-410...)
NanoPiNeo4         378 /locked
NanoPi T4            330/locked
Odroid C2             323/122(ubuntu 16.04) -Odroids have always been the power systems for graphics. (18.04 isn't significantly different)
Raspberry Pi4B     300/136



Libre La Frite         277/uggg   only logged scores of 7 or 8 on screen, so lots going wrong there but has clearly got drivers off screen
Libre Tritium H5    260/locked (actually there's more to this, it actually runs fine with its mali450 off screen, but onscreen is painfull, maybe x11 issues?)
Radxa RockPi4      249/locked (bit dissapointing this, but it does seem to be running with es3.2 drivers)
Odroid N2            212/locked (currently have to use GLmark2-es-fbdev) <<< this is no where near what it can do, waiting for updates to see the beast rise.
Pine Rock64          200/39 Ubuntu 18.04 (though shows Debian screens) bugged out on the test though going to try other OS's
Odroid C1             188/111 ubuntu 18.04 less powerful CPU  but the same GPU as the C2, 1 less core, interesting to see the difference cores make
Rpi3B+(KMSdrivers)    187/80 using X11/mesa and full the KMS drivers, not legacy but running ES2.0

OrangePi Zero+2  150/79
Nano PiM1                144/72  (some tests failed though)
Dragonboard 410c*   144/65
Banana Pi zero*     50/50
Raspberry Pi3B*       50/50 both locked, though Raspberry has drivers GLmark2-es2 does not recognise them correctly.
Vim2*                    44/44 
OrangePi One+       44/29 (should be a lot better but drivers are just not there)
OrangePi Win*        40/18 pity, this is a nippy CPU and adding GPU drivers would make it quite a beast but no sign of any on the horizon (ubuntu 16.04)
Raspberry Pi3B+*    37/25 (it does have gles2.0 drivers but glmark2 and glmark2-es2 emulate, as it can't recognise broadcoms VC4 so its actually quite a bit faster than this
BananaPi M4*         31/21 (it also lacks memory managment so struggles to run anything large and CPU is painfully slow)

Nano Pi 2 (fire)*          0 failed

Rpi3B+(KMSdrivers)     0 failed using X11/Mesa but running glmark2 as OpenGl 2.1 for comparison, but crashes out with a segmentation fault
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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#2
should make this sticky
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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#3
Brian,

I'm curious how you got the scores for the Tinkerboard and RasPi 4? I am not getting near the values you see.

Also, what OS are you using for the Tinkerboard?

And, are you able to get glmark2-es installed on the RasPi 4? I can't seem to find a install option for this.

Cheers,

Jon
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#4
I had to build it myself using these instructions, which also work for ubuntu systems, (*though ubuntu can apt-get it normally) you just need to change the final settings to make it GLES2
so i'm using GLMark2-es2 not GLMark2 which is going to be unpredictacble on GLES systems, even those that claim to do full fat OpenGL.

https://www.pcsuggest.com/install-glmark2-debian/

I'm just using standard Tinkerboard OS, which I think is based on Debian. I should probably update it again to see if the downgrade has been fixed. I always try to avoid exotic OS's, and work with the bog standard OS supplied.

The main thing is that many boards have GLMark2-es2 locked to frame rate, which means that when you run it will never be more than 50 or 60fps depending on the refresh rate, so the --off-screen option gives you a truer measure of performance.

Emulated systems usually report a standard mesa gles3.0 render system and nearly always show the 1st 2 tests as the same values, so there's no buffering in action. As such you're looking at CPU power rather than GPU power. the Raspberry3's default to emulation becuase GLMark2 can't instansiate a dispman render surface so its not a very accurate example, I guess if I was feeling crazy I could try to add that to the source code but it's a lot of effort.
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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#5
Thanks Brian.

Yeah, I had seen that site and downloaded and installed the glmark2 tool, but I did not see the "-es" version.  However, going back I see in the comment section that someone posted how to get it installed on the Raspbian:

Need:

Code:
apt-get install libegl1-mesa-dev libgles2-mesa-dev


And configure as such:

Code:
./waf configure --with-flavors=x11-glesv2
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#6
yes I noticed that comment today looking over the link when I was sending it to you, does it get it working on a Pi? if so whats the score and I'll post it. It seems counter intuitive to me to install mesa libs when there are broadcom libs on board..

and indeed setting the flavour to glesv2 gives you the required -es2 version.
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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#7
Yeah, the score for the Pi 4 still only comes in at about 76 using the --off-screen option. The Tinkerboard clocks in at around 460. That is a big diff.
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#8
that sounds to me like an emulated score, which is odd... I had no problems getting it to compile and run and to do a sanity check I ran it again last night, the same scrore give or take a few point on Rpi4. It may have something to do with the legacy driver issue I ran into when I first got my Pi4 and was expecting it to be the same as a 3B?
My Tinkerboard still gives me around 400, dropping around 70 points from when I first tested it.
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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#9
Its clear to me now, that the raspberry's scores are very dependant on what drivers you activate with raspi-config and what version of Opengles drivers you use when building

I don't especially like using the KMS drivers and opengl, as the on board legacy drivers are written specifically for openGLES... but ...I guess you have the choice...use what works.

Latest version of GLMark2 does actually support dispmanx usage, but can't get it to build so no idea if that would give a better or worse score.
Brian Beuken
Lecturer in Game Programming at Breda University of Applied Sciences.
Author of The Fundamentals of C/C++ Game Programming: Using Target-based Development on SBC's 



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